Anesthesia

In 1975, the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) established the Office Anesthesia Evaluation Program. It was designed to assure that each practicing AAOMS member maintained a properly equipped office and was prepared to use accepted techniques for managing emergencies and complications of anesthesia in the treatment of the OMS patient in the office or outpatient setting.

AAOMS fellows/members must have their offices successfully evaluated and re-evaluated by their component society every five years or in accordance with state law.

Dr. Krueger has successfully completed the AAOMS Office Anethesia Evaluation Program since establishing his practice in Bend in 2000.  This helps assure the uptmost in patient safety for all surgical procedures. 

Anesthesia  Options

Nitrous Oxide Analgesia: This is administered via a nasal hood and is often referred to as “laughing gas”.  This provides the patient with mild relaxation during the surgery.  The degree of analgesia can be adjusted to the ideal level for each patient.  The effects fully resolve within 10 minutes after the procedure and allows the patient to safely drive home following the procedure. 

Oral Sedation:  This is administered via a pill or liquid form.  It provides a mild level of relaxation for the patient and is often combined with Nitrous Oxide.  This requires an escort to drive the patient home after the procedure. 

IV Sedation:  The medications are administered via an intravenous route.  Medications are given to provide the patient full relaxation and pain control throughout the surgery.  This is an excellent way to resolve any anxiety a patient might have about their surgery.  This requires the patient to arrive not having eaten for the past 8 hours and an escort to drive them home after surgery. 

General AnesthesiaThe medications are administered via an intravenous route.  Medications are given to have the patient fully asleep throughout the surgery.  This level of anesthesia provides the optimum state for the patient to be fully unaware that their surgery has been accomplished.  This requires the patient to arrive not having eaten for the past 8 hours and an escort to drive them home after surgery. 

Inhalational General Anesthesia:  This is an excellent choice for our pediatric patients and our patients with extreme anxiety.  The patient simply drifts off to sleep while genlty breathing in the anesthesia.  The patient is kept fully asleep throughout the surgery and gently awakes ready to begin their recovery.  This requires the patient to arrive not having eaten for the past 8 hours and an escort to drive them home after surgery.